The Best Cheesy Chicken Chile Verde Flautas (Rolled Tacos)

Ingredients

Oil for frying

30 flour tortillas

Whole shredded chicken (rotisserie chicken works great)

4 roasted hatch chiles or canned green chile

1/2 white onion (cook until translucent)

1/2 cup Mexican sour cream (lala)

1/2 Tbsp Black Pepper

2 cups Mexican cheese blend + Hatch pepper cheese if available

How to make the best authentic Salsa Picante https://teamupinternational.com/how-to-make-the-best-authentic-salsa-picante/

Taco

A taco (US: /ˈtɑːkoʊ/, UK: /ˈtækoʊ/, Spanish: [ˈtako]) is a traditional Mexican dish consisting of a small hand-sized corn or wheat tortilla topped with a filling. The tortilla is then folded around the filling and eaten by hand. A taco can be made with a variety of fillings, including beef, pork, chicken, seafood, beans, vegetables, and cheese, allowing for great versatility and variety. They are often garnished with various condiments, such as salsa, guacamole, or sour cream, and vegetables, such as lettuce, onion, tomatoes, and chiles. Tacos are a common form of antojitos, or Mexican street food, which have spread around the world.

Tacos can be contrasted with similar foods such as burritos, which are often much larger and rolled rather than folded; taquitos, which are rolled and fried; or chalupas/tostadas, in which the tortilla is fried before filling.

The origins of the taco are not precisely known, and etymologies for the culinary usage of the word are generally theoretical.  Taco in the sense of a typical Mexican dish comprising a maize tortilla folded around food is just one of the meanings connoted by the word, according to the Real Academia Española, publisher of Diccionario de la Lengua Española. This meaning of the Spanish word “taco” is a Mexican innovation, but the word “taco” is used in other contexts to mean “wedge; wad, plug; billiard cue; blowpipe; ramrod; short, stocky person; [or] short, thick piece of wood.”  The etymological origin of this sense of the word is Germanic and has cognates in other European languages, including the French word “tache” and the English word “tack.”

In Spain, the word “taco” can also be used in the context of tacos de jamón [es]: these are diced pieces of ham, or sometimes bits and shavings of ham leftover after a larger piece is sliced.  They can be served on their own as tapas or street food, or can be added to other dishes such as salmorejo, omelettes, stews, empanadas, or melón con jamón [es].

According to one etymological theory, the culinary origin of the term “taco” in Mexico can be traced to its employment, among Mexican silver miners, as a term signifying “plug.” The miners used explosive charges in plug form, consisting of a paper wrapper and gunpowder filling.

Indigenous origins are also proposed. One possibility is that the word derives from the Nahuatl word “tlahco”, meaning “half” or “in the middle,”[9] in the sense that food would be placed in the middle of a tortilla.  Furthermore, dishes analogous to the taco were known to have existed in Pre-Columbian society—for example, the Nahuatl word “tlaxcalli” (a type of corn tortilla).

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